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The Mary Elizabeth Garrett Medical Student Research Award

The Mary Elizabeth Garrett Medical Student Research Award is awarded annually to a medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Funding for the award comes from the Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation. The purpose of the award is to provide an opportunity for research into contributions made by women in the field of medicine. Research is to be conducted in the collections of the Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions which include significant documentation relating to the rise of women in medicine from the late nineteenth century to the present. The recipient of the Research Award is notified in the spring and conducts research over the course of 1 year. A Research Award of $3500 is intended to be used to support the research of a medical student for a minimum of 8 weeks during the summer (May-August) of Research Award. Alternatively, students who do not have a continual period of 8 weeks available would need to commit an average of 4 hours per week for a 12 month period to their research.

The Mary Elizabeth Garrett Medical Student Research Award will provide opportunities for a medical student to conduct original research in historical collections and for disseminating findings with peers and the public.

The Research Award recipient will work closely with a faculty mentor and an archivist mentor. The final product of research completed by the Research Award recipient will be preserved in the Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives, creating a rich, continually growing, and publicly available body of original scholarship that will serve as a valuable resource for generations to come.

Who can apply?

The Research Award is open to medical students of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine not in the final year of their program. Applicants conducting their research during the summer should intend to reside in Baltimore during their research period.

How do I apply?

Applicants must complete the Mary Elizabeth Garrett Medical Student Research Award Application which explains all requirements for successful completion. The deadline to receive all required materials is March 9, 2018, by 11:59 p.m. Notifications will be received by all applicants during the week of March 26, 2018.

Applicants must first identify and communicate with both a faculty mentor and an archivist mentor. They should plan to coordinate preparation of their application with mentors in advance of the deadline so that mentors can help applicants determine a viable set of materials with which to work. Given sufficient advance time, archivist mentors will also be available to help applicants formulate and refine draft research project proposals to assure a realistic, engaging program of research that will take full advantage of the relevant archival and historical collections at Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives.

What kinds of resources are available to support my research?

Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives: Located on the Mount Washington campus, the Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives is the official archival repository for the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions: The Johns Hopkins Hospital, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Primary resources in the Medical Archives document research, education, and health care delivery from the 1890s through 2017. They include textual, visual, and audio materials as well as artifacts, scientific instrumentation, medical paraphernalia, fine and decorative arts. The multimedia collections provide diverse options for chronicling the historical and cultural environment of the medical institutions.

Descriptions of holdings are available on their website

To contact the archives to request an archivist mentor, or for any other inquiries: archives@jhmi.edu

Other repositories of The Johns Hopkins University that may have relevant resources include:

The Historical Collection of the Institute of the History of Medicine: Located on the third floor of the Welch Library Building, the Historical Collection is the resource center for the history of medicine for the Hopkins community. A research collection covering all aspects of the history of medicine, public health and allied sciences, it contains over 70,000 volumes. A large, comprehensive library of secondary sources accompanies a smaller, but choice collection of rare books, manuscripts, prints, photographs, medals, stamps and objects. Descriptions of holdings are available on their website

To contact the librarian for any inquiries: ruggere@jhmi.edu

Ferdinand Hamburger University Archives: Located on the Homewood campus, the Ferdinand Hamburger University Archives is the official archival repository for the Homewood Campus divisions of The Johns Hopkins University: Central University Administration, Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, G.W.C. Whiting School of Engineering, Carey Business School, and the School of Education. It is also the repository for the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, based in Washington, DC. Descriptions of holdings are available on their website:

To contact the archives for any inquiries: archives@lists.johnshopkins.edu

Can I use archival collections that are restricted?

Legal and regulatory codes for protection of individual privacy (such as HIPAA and FERPA) as well as Johns Hopkins’ internal policies limit access to certain types of information in archival collections. However, these codes and Johns Hopkins’ policies do include provisions for certain types of authorized access to types of information within the collections. In some cases, applications may be submitted to the Privacy Board of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions to obtain a waiver of authorization to access these collections, and archivist mentors can assist with this process. Applications are reviewed and adjudicated in accordance with applicable legal and regulatory codes and Johns Hopkins policy. Please be sure to discuss any possible access issues in the collections you plan to use with your archivist mentor.

What are the requirements of the Research Award?

Proposed research must explore some aspect of the contributions made by women associated with the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine utilizing the resources of the Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives. The Research Award recipient is required to produce a final product such as a research paper or digital resource, and should be prepared to present findings at a public event during the subsequent academic year. The Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation requests a one page report on the Fellow's research experience; a copy of the final product (with the ability to post excerpts from the paper/project); and a photo and bio of the Fellow for web and newsletter announcements.

The recipient of the research award is expected to reside in Baltimore for a minimum of 8 weeks during the summer or another continual 8 week period, and to devote at least 25 hours to research each week; or an average of 4 hours per week for 12 months.

The awardee will receive two letters of acceptance, one of which he/she must complete, sign, and return to the director of the Research Award program before beginning the term of the Research Award, which will confirm that the recipient understands and agrees to the terms of the award. Failure to complete these agreed upon requirements may result in an awardee forfeiting some or all of his or her award back to the School of Medicine.

What are the requirements of faculty and archivist mentors?

Faculty mentors should be willing and able to provide guidance and feedback on the student’s proposed research topic. They should be available to consult with the student during the course of the Research Award (in person, ideally, although phone/Skype/email are also acceptable).

Archivist mentors selected from the staff of the Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives should also be willing and able to provide guidance and feedback on the student’s proposed research topic. They can advise the student on what materials relevant to their proposed research topic are available in the archives, and suggest refinements to the proposed topic based on available sources. During the fellowship, archivists will serve as a resource for the students utilizing their collections, answering questions about the collections that arise during the course of the research.

Selection and Award

The Research Award recipient will be selected by a review committee in the spring semester for a summer fellowship. During the application process, students must identify a faculty mentor, an archivist mentor, and a preliminary list of resources that will be important to their research. A Research Award of $3500 will be made to support the research project defined in the application. Any additional research expenses that may be relevant (such as travel to other archives or libraries) that may emerge over the course of the fellowship must be drawn from the total amount of the medical student Research Award.

About Mary Elizabeth Garrett

Mary Elizabeth Garrett, a Baltimore philanthropist, successfully campaigned for the admission of women to the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Garrett also advocated that women faculty of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine be afforded same rights and privileges as male faculty. Her leadership and philanthropy created major precedents that other universities later followed. She was active in the women’s suffrage and other causes promoting opportunities for women. In the spring 2017 she was inducted in the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame.

The Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives created a web exhibit, Celebrating the Philanthropy of Mary Elizabeth Garrett in 2005.

A biography Mary Elizabeth Garrett: Society and Philanthropy in the Gilded Age by Kathleen Sander was published in 2008.

The Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation

The Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation, formerly the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine, was established with the strong belief that understanding history plays a powerful role in shaping the future. The resolute stand women took to establish their place as physicians and medical scientists propels our vision forward. We know the value of experience and see the impact pioneers have made in the fields of medicine and the medical sciences, especially when it comes to the unique legacy left by women.

Our work perpetuates the legacy these women created through their tireless determination, extraordinary passion, and unmatched fortitude. We will not allow their stories to rust; we use them to build a path to a future still being envisioned, but solidly supported by those who came before. There can be no purposeful future without the perspective of history, thus we maintain the path behind in order to inspire those forging ahead.


 

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